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Film Festival - Rudy

Monday, July 12, 2004 & Monday, July 11, 2005
MAC Playhouse - 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Rudy

Hosted by: Dr. Robert Singer, Professor of English
College Now English Course Coordinator
Professor Jennifer White, College Now Student Development Course Coordinator

About the Movie: Rudy
Director, David Anspaugh 1993 - Rating PG

Before he became a Hobbit, Sean Astin played "Rudy". Rudy grew up in a steel mill town where most people ended up working, but he wanted to play football at Notre Dame. There were problems: low grades and poor athletic skills, and he was half the size of other players. But he had the drive and spirit. Will he make the team? This film will make you cheer.

About the Presenter: Professor Jennifer White
Professor Jennifer White is the Assistant Director of the New Start Program at Kingsborough. She also serves as the Student Development Course Coordinator for College Now. Professor White received her BA in Psychology from the University of Maryland and a M.S. in Counseling and Personnel Services from Fordham University. Having worked with transfer students for the past four years, Jennifer has seen, first hand, the struggles that students work through while deciding on where to go to college and which major to choose. According to Professor White, "Rudy is an encouraging film that clearly demonstrates that there is more than one way to reach your goals."

Writing Assignments: Rudy ACT-Prep

Extra Credit Assignments
In the film Rudy, you saw a young man adjust, with varying levels of difficulty, to the dreams and demands of college life. Rudy's expectations, his vision of what college life would be for him, were often at odds with the assessment of his abilities other people ungenerously had made. He had to work harder than most to prove his "worth." Rudy's short-term goal, success at college-level sports, was also consistent with his implied long-term goal; hard work and application could lead to success in his career and in his home life. For Rudy, success meant accepting some setbacks, consistency, and not just "winning."

You have been asked to write a letter to a college admissions officer for a campus you are interested in attending, in which you will discuss some of your short and long-term personal goals, and how the college experience at his or her particular campus could help you achieve these goals and ideals. You want the college admissions officer to be interested in you, so in your letter, focus on both your personal goals, which could involve areas of study that interest you, professions you are considering, etc., and your public or social goals such as how you might like to contribute to the family, neighborhood, society, etc. You want the college admissions officer to conclude that, like Rudy, you too can achieve, even when others may doubt you can succeed.

Mini-Research Project

(NOTE: THIS IS NOT A RESEARCH PAPER-IT IS A RESEARCH-ORIENTED EXPERIENCE IN WHICH STUDENTS GATHER AND CATEGORIZE INFORMATION. THEY CAN PREPARE OUTLINES, NOTE-CARDS AND A BIBLIOGRAPHY, CITE REFERENCES, OR PRACTICE ANY COMBINATION OF THESE SKILLS ASSOCIATED WITH PREPARING A RESEARCH PAPER.)

Utilizing the library and its resources, and/or material from the Internet, prepare an investigative project that focuses on any of these topics associated with the film Rudy:

a-Careers related to sports (not professional athletes)
b-History of college football (contemporary, or by decade)
c-Notre Dame: admissions policy
d-Football movies
e-"The Ivy League"

Standard College Essay

Many issues arise from the analysis and discussion of the film Rudy. Some of the more personal issues involve getting along, no matter how difficult, with your teammates, the importance of having friends and support, believing in yourself, and acting on your dreams. Some broader social issues discussed in the film involve the importance of sports in our lives, the positive role of both the individual and the "team," overcoming educational and personal obstacles, and the belief that trying to succeed and to win does not always guarantee a Hollywood "happy ending," but that serious personal effort can make a difference.

In a full-length essay (approximately 400-500 words), later to be revised for content and correctness, discuss any of the issues raised in the film Rudy that you consider to be of special interest either for you, as a high school student now, as a future college student, or for society in general. Explain why and how these issues are significant not only in the film but also in relationship to your own life and experience, as well as to society's sense of success, or both.


Event Photos Rudy - July 12, 2004

Rudy Rudy

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